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New working models – Establishing new standards for crowdworking

Retail has faced unprecedented challenges this past year (and counting).

As you maybe have read in my previous post, I explained why digitalisation has a big impact on the working world. Digitalisation has resulted in new models of employment like crowdsourcing: This means outsourcing of projects to the worldwide community. The new tasks are handled by so-called crowdworkers.

Crowdworking

This is a rather new model of employment and crowdworkers benefit from freedom as they work as freelancers. So, we want to ensure that they can rely on good working standards. As crowdworking is a crucial part to our service model – crowdtesting – we started a self-imposed guideline in 2015 to improve the working conditions for all parties. In this article, I’d like to share my thoughts about the progress we’ve made so far.

Establishing a Code of Conduct

In 2015, we worked together with other crowdsourcing providers and the German Association of Crowdsourcing to establish a Code of Conduct. With this set of self-imposed rules, we wanted to make crowdworking be fruitful for all parties: companies on the one hand and testers on the other. Testing should enable a profitable income as well as a motivating form of employment. In addition to this, the Code of Conduct includes guidelines on data protection, terms of reference and communication amongst other important principles.

Last year, we held a roundtable discussion with testers, a scientist and representatives of the German workers’ union to get feedback and to improve it. One outcome was that the guidelines were formulated in too general of terms. So, at the beginning of this year we concretised the rules. Also, new companies signed the code which I think helps testers a lot in finding a fair working environment in this industry. Some days ago, we helped to establish a Omuds Office for crowdworking. In case of complaints testers can contact this institution. It’s composed of representatives of the German Association of Crowdsourcing, the workers’ union and the signees of the Code of Conduct.

To put it in a nutshell, I’d say that we are very happy that we can help to create a better working environment for everyone and especially for the testers. We as a company benefit from crowdworking, and happy testers motivate us to follow this path and continue to improve working conditions.

Testbirds specialises in the testing of software such as apps, websites and Internet of Things applications by using innovative technologies and solutions. Under the slogan, “Testing Reality”, the company offers various testing methods to its clients looking to optimise the user-friendliness and functionality of their digital products. With over 250,000 registered testers located in 193 countries, Testbirds is one of the world’s leading crowdtesting providers. In addition, the IT service provider utilises cloud based technologies to support customers in the optimisation of their digital products. The combination of the two testing methods delivers a unique and extensive portfolio that takes the quality of software to the next level. Testbirds was founded in 2011 by Philipp Benkler, Georg Hansbauer and Markus Steinhauser. Today, the company has over 100 employees. Other than its headquarters in Munich, there are now offices in Amsterdam, London and Stockholm, franchises in Hungary and Russia and sales partners in Italy.

© Testbirds GmbH. All rights reserved.




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